Secular Woman

Amplifying the voice, presence, and influence of non-religious women.

5,207 notes

hard-working-slacker:

hard-working-slacker:

My brother donated blood in my place today, since I cannot donate.
Any gay or bisexual man that has had intimate contact with another man since 1977 is BANNED from donating blood, presumably due to the fear of blood-borne illnesses that are often falsely associated with the LGBT+ community.
Any and all blood donated is tested and screened thoroughly, so even if this ban held merit, it would serve no purpose.
The ban on gay blood is discriminatory and unnecessary.
End the stigma.

Ask the White House to lift this harmful ban by signing THIS PETITION.
For more information on the National Gay Blood Drive, check out THIS SITE.

hard-working-slacker:

hard-working-slacker:

My brother donated blood in my place today, since I cannot donate.

Any gay or bisexual man that has had intimate contact with another man since 1977 is BANNED from donating blood, presumably due to the fear of blood-borne illnesses that are often falsely associated with the LGBT+ community.

Any and all blood donated is tested and screened thoroughly, so even if this ban held merit, it would serve no purpose.

The ban on gay blood is discriminatory and unnecessary.

End the stigma.

Ask the White House to lift this harmful ban by signing THIS PETITION.

For more information on the National Gay Blood Drive, check out THIS SITE.

(via thekyriarchywontfuckitself)

108,571 notes

masakhane:

designrevolution:

Courtenay McKay created a series of posters for the Gender Based Violence Prevention Project (GBVPP) at the University of Alberta to spread awareness about rape culture.

The Gender Based Violence Prevention Project is a new project of the Students’ Union that promotes a campus free of gender based violence. Gender Based Violence exists in both visible and invisible ways on our campus and affects the lives of many University students, staff, faculty, and community members. Through education, awareness, and institutional change, we are striving to create a campus free of gender based violence where everyone can feel safe and supported.”

Bre, Masakhane Program Development Intern

(via thekyriarchywontfuckitself)

7,212 notes

loveisrespect:

What is Sexual Coercion?
If someone makes you feel obligated or forced to do something you don’t want to, you may be experiencing coercion. By definition, sexual coercion is “the act of using pressure, alcohol or drugs, or force to have sexual contact with someone against his or her will” and includes “persistent attempts to have sexual contact with someone who has already refused.”
Think of sexual coercion as a spectrum or a range. It can vary from someone verbally egging you on to someone actually forcing you to have contact with them. It can be verbal and emotional, in the form of statements that make you feel pressure, guilt or shame. You can also be made to feel forced through more subtle actions. For example, your partner might:
Make you feel like you owe them — for example, because you’re in a relationship, because you’ve had sex before, because they spent money on you or bought you a gift, because you go home with them
Give you compliments that sound extreme or insincere as an attempt to get you to agree to something
Badger you, yell at you, or hold you down
Give you drugs and alcohol to loosen up your inhibitions
Play on the fact that you’re in a relationship, saying things such as: “Sex is the way to prove your love for me” or “If I don’t get sex from you I’ll get it somewhere else”
React negatively (with sadness, anger or resentment) if you say no or don’t immediately agree to something
Continue to pressure you after you say no
Make you feel threatened or afraid of what might happen if you say no
Try to normalize their sexual expectations — for example, “I need it, I’m a guy.”
In a relationship where sexual coercion is occurring, there is a lack of consent, and the coercive partner doesn’t respect the boundaries or wishes of the other.

loveisrespect:

What is Sexual Coercion?

If someone makes you feel obligated or forced to do something you don’t want to, you may be experiencing coercion. By definition, sexual coercion is “the act of using pressure, alcohol or drugs, or force to have sexual contact with someone against his or her will” and includes “persistent attempts to have sexual contact with someone who has already refused.”

Think of sexual coercion as a spectrum or a range. It can vary from someone verbally egging you on to someone actually forcing you to have contact with them. It can be verbal and emotional, in the form of statements that make you feel pressure, guilt or shame. You can also be made to feel forced through more subtle actions. For example, your partner might:

  • Make you feel like you owe them — for example, because you’re in a relationship, because you’ve had sex before, because they spent money on you or bought you a gift, because you go home with them
  • Give you compliments that sound extreme or insincere as an attempt to get you to agree to something
  • Badger you, yell at you, or hold you down
  • Give you drugs and alcohol to loosen up your inhibitions
  • Play on the fact that you’re in a relationship, saying things such as: “Sex is the way to prove your love for me” or “If I don’t get sex from you I’ll get it somewhere else”
  • React negatively (with sadness, anger or resentment) if you say no or don’t immediately agree to something
  • Continue to pressure you after you say no
  • Make you feel threatened or afraid of what might happen if you say no
  • Try to normalize their sexual expectations — for example, “I need it, I’m a guy.”

In a relationship where sexual coercion is occurring, there is a lack of consent, and the coercive partner doesn’t respect the boundaries or wishes of the other.

(Source: ocadvsa, via fuckyeahsexeducation)